Arte Povera

 Arte Povera

“Arte Povera” is a contemporary art movement. The Arte Povera movement took place between the end of the 1960s and the beginning of the 1970s in major cities throughout Italy and above all in Turin. Other cities where the movement was also important are Milan, Rome, Genoa, VeniceNaples and Bologna. The term was coined by Italian art critic GermanoCelant in 1967[1] and introduced in Italy during the period of upheaval at the end of the 1960s, when artists were taking a radicalstance. Artists began attacking the values of established institutions of government, industry, and culture.The Arte Povera is an intellectual adventure against extreme radicalism, which opposes the formalist proposals of the great American currents of the time: pop ‘art, op’art … Refusing the mannerisms of a society devoted to consumption, the Arte Povera privileges instinct, natural and ephemeral.The “Arte Povera artists were really pioneers in encouraging sustainability by coming back to nature and criticizing consumerism.

The most visible feature of the arte povera is the use of so-called « poor » materials: natural or recoverable and perishable: Sand, salt, coffee, plants, animals, tar, rope, coal, cotton – plants, animals and minerals – become a new material from which to compose ephemeral works, which evolve over time.

Many are inspired by “Arte Povera”. For example, the brand lingerie Do YouGeen uses paper envelops in its packaging inspired by the use of paper by the “Arte Povera” artists.

Artists of “Arte Povera”

Giovanni Anselmo, AlighieroBoetti, Pier-Paolo Calzolari, Luciano Fabro, PieroGilardi, JannisKounellis, Mario Merz, Marisa Merz, Giulio Paolini, PinoPascali, Giuseppe Penone…

 

Examples of “Arte Povera”

Giovanni Anselmo – La structure qui mange, 1968

Giovanni Anselmo – La structure qui mange, 1968

This work rests on the contrast between the blocks of granite, resisting the test of time, and the lettuce, symbol of vitality and it perishable. In order to maintain the fragile balance between the two, it is often necessary to change the lettuce which makes the original work a totally ephemeral whole.

Giuseppe Penone – Soffio 6, 1978

Giuseppe Penone – Soffio 6, 1978

To make this sculpture, Penone has left its imprint in terracotta, using techniques and materials that have been used since the dawn of time … This vase is part of a series of 6 pieces aimed at exploring the relationship of sculptor at work.

Michelangelo Pistoletto - Vénus aux chiffons, 1967

Michelangelo Pistoletto – Vénus aux chiffons, 1967

Tony Cragg 'Stack'

Tony Cragg ‘Stack’

Mario Merz

Mario Merz

Mario Merz, Tavola a spirale

Mario Merz, Tavola a spirale

W.Franklin: Minimalisme

W.Franklin: Minimalisme

Pino Pascali, 1968.

Pino Pascali, 1968.

Giuseppe Penone

Giuseppe Penone

Piero Manzoni

Piero Manzoni